Born A Gangster: Beannca “Bebe” Catherine

Bebe Catherine was born & raised in Saint Catherine Parish. Also known as “Spanish Town”, St Catherine is a town located in the south east of Jamaica.

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Born to a family of powerful gangsters, Bebe was introduced to the street lifestyle before she was born. Her mother, “Sandy” was 6 months pregnant with Bebe when she was sentenced to 6 years in Riker’s Island, New York city’s most dangerous prison on drug charges due to her alleged affiliation to Jamaica’s most feared criminal organization, The Shower Posse. Sandy’s charges were later overturned and she was extradited back to her homeland of Jamaica as a condition of her release.

Bebe grew up a privileged child due to her family’s power and wealth. She was raised with the most elite & influential and attended some of the best schools the island had to offer. Though Jamaica is known for its tropical blue skies and waters, beyond the breathtaking tourist attractions brews deadly street wars in which gangs battle to control the country’s drug trades. When she was a teenager, her mother sent her to the Untied States to live with family members in hopes of protecting her from  the extreme violence and dangerous conditions on the island.

As Bebe grew into adulthood the very same vices that her mother had hoped to protect her from, captivated her. She too began dating (and eventually married) an alleged high ranking member of The Shower Posse and had 2 children. Her story would be anything but a fairytale as her husband was later indicted on drug and gun charges in the much publicized raids of the international organization, then ran by Jamaican druglord Christopher ‘Dudus’ Coke. Bebe’s husband was sentenced to 14 years for his alleged involvement with the “Posse” which left her to fend for herself and her children. As many wives and girlfriends of gangsters often find themselves abandoned due to the repercussions of the streets, Bebe began making her rounds by collecting on debts owed to her husband. She eventually found herself knee-deep in the game, a choice that would cost her drastically.

Eventually she was indicted on her own charges and found herself back on Riker’s Island, this time as a mother herself. After spending almost 2 years in jail she was released on one condition, that she return to Jamaica –and never return to the United States.

Since arriving back in Jamaica, Bebe has made a choice not only change her lifestyle but to shield her children from the same pitfalls both she and her mother suffered from the streets. She now works with various charitable organizations such as The Prettie Committee, which supplies women of the island with trendy clothes, shoes, accessories, food, and household items. She also spends her spare pursing what she calls her “first tru love”, writing.

Check out the blog dedicated to Christopher Coke: www.thejamaicandon.blog.com.

Follow Bebe on Twitter:

www.twitter.com/bebefashion859

Written By: Bailey Manhattan

GANGSTERS: America’s Most Evil: The Kingston Kingpin

Brandy Cavalli (Coke) and a group of writers and media production has been instrumental in putting together much of the television and print media famed incarcerated “kingpin” Christopher ‘Dudus’ Coke.

The newest project to hit airwaves is Gangsters: America’s Most Evil, a cinematic documentary series that explores the rise and fall of some of the most nefarious and notorious criminals brought to justice.
Brandy Cavalli (Coke) and her team worked extensively with producers of the very popular hit show which airs on the BIOGRAPHY channel, but due to Coke’s latest legal troubles, were given no tentative date of which the finished product would air on the cable television’s network.
“The Kingston Kingpin” features candid interviews from some of the people closest to the case as well as previous prosecutors and investigators.
Brandy, an independent crime writer and journalist, has been working with members of the Coke family to write and produce a more detailed documentary based on the life of Christopher “Dudus” Coke, entitled The Last King Of Jamrock.
No dates have been confirmed on the filming and release of the documentary.
Brandy, rumored to be the ex girlfriend/lover of Christopher Coke, is now married to “Big Dave” an alleged high ranking official of the Black Mafia Family (BMF) but still contributes and coordinates media and public relations for Christopher Coke.

Check Out the OFFICIAL BIO Channel for more information on “The Kingston Kingpin”
GANGSTERS: America’s Most Evil

The daughter of American Gangster Frank Lucas speaks

 Francine Lucas-Sinclair spent part of her childhood being raised by her grandparents, while her parents served time in prison. She is the daughter of Frank Lucas, the drug lord depicted in the 2007 film American Gangster, starring Denzel Washington and Russell Crowe.

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AMBLER — Francine Lucas-Sinclair spent part of her childhood being raised by her grandparents, while her parents served time in prison. She is the daughter of Frank Lucas, the drug lord depicted in the 2007 film American Gangster, starring Denzel Washington and Russell Crowe.

Through her experiences as a child with an incarcerated parent, Sinclair was led to establish Yellow Brick Roads, a program that helps children with parents in prison. On Feb. 19 at the Ambler Campus, Lucas-Sinclair presented, “My Father: The American Gangster,” an insight into her life as a child and how it led up to the birth of a new organization for children like herself.

“My father built a heroin pipeline from Southeast Asia to New York and paid soldiers in Asia to smuggle drugs over here and sold it for cheap. My dad looked at this as a business opportunity at the time,” Lucas-Sinclair said.

During the era of the Vietnam War, soldiers used drugs in Vietnam and eventually became addicted to it, Sinclair said. Lucas made $1 million a day from his business.

“We lived in New Jersey where [there] are beautiful houses, picket fences, [and] manicured lawns, but we lived a normal life,” Lucas-Sinclair said. “We took exotic trips, but it wasn’t like people think that he spent enormous amounts of money on extravagant things. Our house was always cheerful – it had lots of friends and family.”

Even with her enjoyable childhood, Lucas-Sinclair was too young to understand what he father did for a living. “As a little girl, I had a loving father and loving mother, all the toys I could ever want, but what I didn’t know what my dad was doing,” she said. “When you’re living on borrowed time, sooner or later it’s going to catch up to you. We were living at the expense of others.“

In 1975, Lucas went down with his business at the end of the war. Lucas-Sinclair was three years old when her father was arrested for drugs.

“The federal authorities came charging into our house,” she said. “I do remember that it was like a stampede of people coming through the door. I remember just screaming, and there was a lot of screaming in our house. I remember being thrown on the floor. It was traumatizing.”

After the arrest, life for Lucas-Sinclair was different.

She visited her dad every day in jail but didn’t understand where he was. Sometimes she believed he was in a fish tank when she talked to him through glass, she said. For her, it was a very confusing time. Her father was sentenced to 70 years in prison, and his family was placed in the witness protection program and moved to Albuquerque, N.M.

After living in New Mexico for three years and not growing accustomed to the lifestyle, they got out of the witness protection program and moved to San Juan, Puerto Rico, with Lucas-Sinclair’s grandparents.

Frank Lucas was released from prison within six years and had a difficult time obtaining work. Lucas went back to the drug business and was caught a second time, but this time, his wife was also involved. He went back for eight years, while his wife went for five years. Lucas-Sinclair went back to San Juan to live with her grandparents.

“They taught me that I have to determine what my life would be,” Lucas-Sinclair said.

When released, her mother enrolled Lucas-Sinclair in the girl scouts.

“I had to take responsibility for my actions. I couldn’t act up,” Lucas-Sinclair said.

Her parents taught Lucas-Sinclair that their choices did not have to determine her choices. From her experiences as a child with incarcerated parents, she decided to start Yellow Brick Roads, formed to help children who, like herself, who have incarcerated parents.

“I think it’s an excellent program,” said Michelle Darby, Kensington Annex Head Start teacher. “Having a support system like this makes them [feel] accepted. It’s more prevalent because there are just so much more parents [being incarcerated] because of drug offenses.”

Sophomore Nick Prince also saw the benefits of the program.

“I felt good to witness the beginnings of a foundation that will eventually benefit a lot of people,” Prince said. “I see it taking more kids away from the streets. I think there needs to be a program recognizing a program where they can relate to.” Sarada Jailal can be reached at

Written By: sjailal@temple.edu.

Redemption: Ex Queen Pin Jemeker Thompson

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Entering the Drug Game

Jemeker Thompson, also known as the “Queen Pin,” rose to the top of  the cocaine trade during the peak of the  1980s crack epidemic in Los  Angeles, California.

Evicted from her home at a young age, Thompson, determined to make money—and fast—partnered with an older man by the name of Anthony M. “Daff” Mosley. Together, they ran a successful cocaine-trafficking business in L.A. The two would later marry and have one child together, a son they named Anthony.

Rule of the ‘Queen Pin’

After several months in the drug game, Thompson and Daff decided to  expand their business by moving to a more in-demand drug, crack-cocaine.  Shortly thereafter, tragedy struck: Daff was killed while washing his  car. Eventually, a devastated Thompson trudged on, continuing to expand  the business she’d started with her late husband by making additional  connections and moving into new territories throughout the United  States. Around this same time, Thompson also invested in an L.A.-based  hair business, selling hair to celebrities, and traveling and holding  shows to show of her products.

Also during this time, Thompson  had begun dating a man known as “Cheese” who would later prove to be  less than trustworthy, cooperating with authorities and  snitching her out after the two parted ways. Thompson subsequently fled  L.A. and went into hiding.

Capture, Conviction and Sentencing

On the run for two years, in 1993,  Thompson—or the “Queen Pin,” as she was known by both the police and  media—finally decided to return to L.A. to attend her son’s 6th grade  graduation ceremony, where law-enforcement officials, suspecting her  attendance, were promptly waiting. She was  subsequently arrested, tried on and convicted of charges related to  drug-trafficking, and sentenced to 15 years in prison.

While in  prison, Thompson developed a stronger faith in God and came to disparage  her previous involvement in the drug game. She also began serving as a  minister to other inmates. “Doors began to open that only God himself  could have opened,” she later stated.

Prison Release and Later Life

Thompson was released from prison in 2005, after serving 13 years in a maximum-security prison alongside the likes of Griselda Blanco and Squeaky Fromme. The Queen Pin now serves as an evangelical minister at Second Chance Ministries in South Central, Los Angeles, which she also owns. According to Thompson, her ministerial mission is to show others that, through God, they’ll always have a second chance in life.

Pain And Poetry: by Jessica Kinkade

Jessica “JLynn” Kinkade is a devoted mother, writer, and most importantly, a survivor.

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Her upcoming book entitled, Pain & Poetry is a memoir that will chronicle her past struggles with domestic and emotional abuse and the pain that she has endured as a result of her previous lifestyle choices as a young woman.

She is using the book to not only help motivate and inspire other women and young girls, but to also bring much needed closure to her own self. She credits her daughters as her inspiration and she is determined to deter them from the pitfalls of the streets in hopes that they will never have to endure the same struggles that she has overcome.

Far removed from the streets, negative influences, and lifestyle that once dominated her life, JLynn is now on a more positive journey and says she even works a 9-5. She plans to use Pain & Poetry as a platform into her newest career endeavor as a motivational speaker against domestic violence.

We caught up with the up and coming published writer and the newest cast member of the upcoming documentary film, “The Gangster’s Girl: Last Girl Standing” for a mini Q/A about her upcoming book release.

What inspired you to write poetry?

Poetry is sometimes the only way I can express myself. It is also a way for me to get closure with tough situations. I have been writing for so long that I don’t actually recall where I initially got my inspiration from, I was very young.

I have been using poetry as a form of expression since I was a child; I had my first poem published at age 11. 

What gives you drive and determination?

My daughters give me my drive and determination! I have 3 beautiful daughters ages 10, 6, & 5. It is very important to me for them to see me take and maintain control of my life. That hasn’t always been the case. It is NOT an option for my girls to go through any of the struggles that I have, period!

What can we expect from your upcoming book Pain & Poetry? 

Pain & Poetry is actually a memoir that includes poetry that I have written over the course of the past 15 years of my life. The poetry that is in the book is relevant to the events covered in the book. The book will touch on sexual abuse and focus on the years of domestic abuse that I have endured. The readers will be led on a journey that includes everything from sex, drugs, strip clubs and violence. The book will detail what I consider the lowest points of my life, and follow me to the point of when I decided to take back my power.

What is the release date of Pain & Poetry? 

If all goes as planned, the book will be released August of 2013. I will keep you posted on the exact date. 

Will there be any book signing events so that you can connect with your audience? 

There will definitely be a launch party held here in my home state of Nashville (TN). Depending on the success of the book, I would love to host signings in other states.  

How can your audience purchase the book? 

Pain & Poetry will be available on Amazon.com. It will also be available in paperback, also digital and audio.

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Follow Gangster Girl Jessica “JLynn” Kinkade

Twitter

For booking or more information about Pain & Poetry email:

Pain_poetry@yahoo.com

Part 2:: A Day With Brandy Cavalli

Brandy Cavalli is a screenplay writer that is quickly gaining notoriety in the independent film world.

She is sought after to work on various underground projects and she was recently chosen to become a member of the prestigious

Women’s Fiction Writers Association.

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In addition to leading her own marketing company, The Social Mob LLC, Brandy also works on the sets of many media projects.

She is known for her girly looks but kick ass attitude. She credits bad girl screenwriter Mae West as somewhat her muse, and when not writing about the mob, she is married to it.

Below is part 2 of my interview with indie screenwriter and international marketer, Brandy Cavalli.

I know that you have gained much success as an international marketer. How long have you been in the entertainment industry?

I have been exposed to the industry my entire life. My father was a popular college dj and he still works in the industry on an executive level, so I was born into the entertainment industry. I personally took my first job in music at the age of 18 working in the music industry. I still do minor projects and some artist management, mostly with reggae artists.

How long have you been writing?

I have kept a journal since the age of about 8. I used to write everyday as a child, as I got older I realized how easy writing came to me. It wasn’t until the last few years that I decided to use my writing as a talent and not just a hobby.

How did you get into writing films?

Actually kind of my chance, I worked in the music industry for many years and built a large network. After getting bored with music, I went into corporate America for a while but always felt like the entertainment industry was where I belonged. I decided that I would try my hand at television and I had planned to work behind the scenes in production or even advertising.

Writing films came about as I was approached to do a couple of reality shows. I went to LA to meet with an agent and realized that I would much rather be in control of any content pertaining to me. I didn’t like the fact that I would have minimal to no creative control so I decided to go to film school and learn to write/produce my own shows and films.

What genres of film most interest you?

I mostly write crime based material. I do enjoy comedy but so far I have only written crime and “gangster” style movie scripts. I would love to write a movie like Friday, both urban but comedy.

How do your male peers accept you as an up and coming female crime writer?

So far I have gotten a lot of love and support from the guys in the industry. There are very few female writers, especially of crime. I mostly work in the independent sector so I don’t have much competition. I’d say most of the guys are accepting and I’ve been approached by a few different producers to write on upcoming underground projects, which is right up my alley. I don’t plan to hit Hollywood anytime soon, I would like to stay independent and perfect my craft more.

What projects are you currently working on?

I just finished working on the script for a crime based indie film called “Lock and Load”, which is currently in production. I do a lot of work with student films in terms of scripts and production. I am also working on a documentary called “The Last King Of Jamrock” which documents the life of Jamaican crime lord Christopher Coke and co-writing the narrative script for the upcoming movie “The Gangster’s Girl: Last Girl Standing”.

What gives you inspiration as a film writer?

I get my inspiration from actual real life events or stories. I like real life documentary style films. I tend to take an interest in events that are considered sinister or crime based. I really enjoy writing about other people, especially of the underworld. I love to get inside of their world and help paint a picture of their world to the outside world. So I would say my inspiration is actually other people.

I know that you recently started your own film company, Femme Fatale Films, tell me more about that.

Femme Fatale Films is just another extension of my company, The Social Mob, LLC. Femme Fatale is a group of women screenwriters, who like me, prefer to write crime based or real life based scripts. In the future we plan to produce our own documentaries and other media. We are a different breed of screenwriters, mainly because we like to go where no other girls have gone before, we go to the streets.

Why did you choose the name Femme Fatale?

Femme Fatale describes me in a nutshell. I also think of sinister or “devious” when I hear the name Femme Fatale, which are exactly the kinds of movies we write.

Congratulations on your induction into the Women’s Fiction Writers Association. What can we expect?

Thank You! The Women’s Fiction Writers Association is a union of women that write fiction movies and scripts. It’s definitely a different world from what I usually do as most of my upcoming movie scripts are non-fiction, meaning real life based. I am excited to get the chance to work under other women in the industry. Hopefully one day I can write for prime time television (Hollywood). It’s a good opportunity and I am so honored to even be considered a member.

What other plans do you have career wise?

Right now I just want to focus on perfecting my writing skills. I do a lot of freelance writing and I am doing some intern work with a major local news station here in Atlanta, and learning a lot about production. In the future I plan to produce film and videos and other media. My first love is marketing so I plan to write, produce and market my own projects and make all the money. I am always thinking of ways to make all the money, not just some of the money.

I heard through the grapevine that you were recently engaged or married? Congratulations.

Thank you.

Being a gangster film writer seems as it would come easy to you based on your alleged ties to the underworld. How does your partner feel about your line of work?

He is ok with it. As you have stated, it is something that I am familiar with and it comes naturally. He is very supportive of my career and he gives me a lot of inspiration and push. He’s a hustler so he’s good with whatever I decide as long as I am happy and it makes me money.

There were rumors in the indie world that you were looking to write and produce a “Goodfellas” style movie about the Black Mafia Family (BMF) crime organization, is that still a possibility?

Yeah, it’s a possibility. I spoke to my hubby about it but we haven’t made any definitive plans. I feel like it would be a great movie and I would love to write one and I am sure he would be down for it. Maybe one day in the future we will put something together. There is and will never be another organization like BMF so it would seem like a no brainer to make a movie about them. – A real movie, no Hollywood bullshit.

In addition to co-writing on the film, do you plan to share your story on the Gangster Girls documentary?

As of now I am not sure. My other half is in full support of me being on the film but I don’t know if I will yet. I prefer to work behind the scenes, so you gotta stay tuned for that, it would be a crazy story. I would probably cry the whole time during filming, Lol. So far they are building a great cast of girls that have compelling stories and I am so excited about working with them. I enjoy helping others paint their picture. We will see if I decide to step in or not, it’s a strong possible though.

I also read on twitter that you may be the next cast member on the upcoming reality show entitled, BMF Wives? Is that true?

No. I am not sure how that rumor started but I am not going to appear on BMF wives. I love the concept of the project though. I would love to work on it from a creative standpoint, but I am not signed on to appear on the show.

What other projects are you working on outside of film writing?

I am writing my first mini series called “From a Socialite to the Mob” which is a memoir style series that documents a young girl’s life from wholesome beginnings to becoming the wife of an alleged mobster. In addition to that, I am working on a comic book series with CV Comics in which I will write the dialogue for a female vixen character. I am also doing some freelance writing for lifestyle and entertainment based magazines. All in all just perfecting my craft and staying busy.

What do you feel is the biggest misconception about female crime writers?

The biggest misconception is that we as women don’t have the experience to write gangster based flicks, which is 100% not true. When you have lived in the underworld it exposes you to a lot and you learn the ropes, the lingo and the way things work in that world. As a writer I feel that I am more qualified then a lot of male writers who have never touched that world. It’s still hard for society to accept a woman talking about guns and violence, but truth is there are some women that are just as vicious as the men. I can probably write a gangster tale with my eyes closed.

 Check Out PART 1 of this Interview

Follow Brandy Cavalli

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Femme Fatale Films

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